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Native Plant information by Doug Tallamy

Page history last edited by Gardener 11 years, 7 months ago

Native plant information by Dr. Doug Tallamy, Professor & Chair of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at U. of Delaware

 

"The wild animals we enjoy and would like to have in our lives will not be part of our future if we take away their food and the places they live. Unfortunately we are doing just that by trading our wild-lands for uncontrolled expansion of suburbia. The obvious consequence is that in too many areas of our country there is no place left for wildlife other than suburbia itself.  This forces those who value biodiversity to consider a new approach to gardening in suburbia. For suburbia to become a functioning ecosystem for more than just humans, we must first accept the notion that all plants are not created equal, particularly in their ability to support wildlife. Most of our native plant-eaters are not able to eat alien plants.  Therefore, if we want to support wildlife, we have to increase the number and diversity of native plants in suburbia. Fortunately, this is quite easy to do. "
Scroll down below to read which plants best support Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies).  The higher the number of species supported the greater the biodiversity provided by the particular plant. 

                      20 Most Valuable Native Woody and Perennial Genera in terms of supporting

                                 biodiversity in the mid-Atlantic region  by Dr. Doug Tallamy  

 

Woody Plants

 

 

Perennials

Plant Genus

Common Name

# of Lepidoptera

 

Plant Genus

Common Name

# of Lepidoptera

 

 

species supported

 

 

 

species supported

Quercus

oak

513

 

Aster

asters

111

Salix

willow

437

 

Solidago

goldenrod

107

Prunus

black cherry

433

 

Eupatorium

joe pye, boneset

42

Acer

maple

285

 

Carex

sedges

36

Betula

birch

413

 

Ipomoca

morning glory

35

Populus

poplar

361

 

Lupinus

lupine

33

Vaccinium

blueberry

257

 

Lonicera

honeysuckle

32

Malus

crabapple

299

 

Viola

violets

22

Ulmus

elm

190

 

Geranium

geraniums

18

Alnus

alder

255

 

Rudbeckia

black-eyed susan

16

Carya

hickory

199

 

Oenothera

evening primrose

15

Tilia

basswood

140

 

Iris

iris

14

Pinus

pine

204

 

Asclepias

milkweed

12

Crataegus

hawthorn

159

 

Penstemon

beardtongue

8

Fraxinus

ash

143

 

Verbena

verbena

8

Picea

spruce

150

 

Phlox

phlox

6

Rosa

filbert

131

 

Monarda

bee balm

6

Fagus

beech

126

 

Veronica

veronica

6

Juglans

walnut

125

 

Schizachyrium

little bluestem

6

Castanea

chestnut

125

 

Lobelia

cardinal flower

4

For full details read Doug Tallamy's website info on Lepidopteran Use of Native & Alien Ornamental Plants. At the site read the Instructions then download the material.

 

In November 2007 Doug Tallamy's book, Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens was published by Timber Press. Beautiful photos, a must read for all gardeners.  In April 2009 an updated and revised version was printed, Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants

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